ABOUT UZ COLLECTION

 “An immediate and recognizable language identifies the first collection of outdoor products we designed for YAAZ: the one of simplicity! 

We love pure forms that communicate peace and intimacy at first glance. Able to make us feel at home immediately. Welcomed. "

"any object entering our homes has an emanation, vibrates on frequencies that can be more or less harmonic, we've to learn to choose between what makes us feel good and what doesn't"

"We worked on the pure geometric shape of the cylinder, we love its 
austere roundness, never affected, its warm essentiality"
 
"Working by subtraction is difficult but it's the empty space that 
fascinates us because it's expressive, full of intentions and release space"
 
 

MINIMALISM / VISUAL ART

Minimalism in visual art, generally referred to as “minimal art”, “literalist art” and “ABC Art”, emerged in New York in the early 1960s as new and older artists moved toward geometric abstraction; exploring via painting in the cases of Nassos Daphnis, Frank Stella, Kenneth Noland, Al Held, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Ryman and others; and sculpture in the works of various artists including David Smith and Anthony Caro. Judd’s sculpture was showcased in 1964 at Green Gallery in Manhattan, as were Flavin’s first fluorescent light works, while other leading Manhattan galleries like Leo Castelli Gallery and Pace Gallery also began to showcase artists focused on geometric abstraction.

Kazimir Malevich, Black Square, 1915, oil on canvas, 79.5 x 79.5 cm, Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

In a more broad and general sense, one finds European roots of minimalism in the geometric abstractions of painters associated with the Bauhaus, in the works of Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian and other artists associated with the De Stijl movement, and the Russian Constructivist movement, and in the work of the Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși.

Minimal art is also inspired in part by the paintings of Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, Josef Albers, and the works of artists as diverse as Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Giorgio Morandi, and others. Minimalism was also a reaction against the painterly subjectivity of Abstract Expressionism that had been dominant in the New York School during the 1940s and 1950s.

 
Yves Klein had painted monochromes as early as 1949, and held the first private exhibition of this work in 1950—but his first public showing was the publication of the Artist’s book Yves: Peintures in November 1954.
 

Design, architecture, and spaces 

The term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture, wherein the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist architectural designers focus on the connection between two perfect planes, elegant lighting, and the void spaces left by the removal of three-dimensional shapes in an architectural design. Minimalist architecture became popular in the late 1980s in London and New York, where architects and fashion designers worked together in the boutiques to achieve simplicity, using white elements, cold lighting, and large space with minimum objects and furniture.

Minimalistic design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture.[citation needed] The works of De Stijl artists are a major reference: De Stijl expanded the ideas of expression by meticulously organizing basic elements such as lines and planes.[citation needed] With regard to home design, more attractive “minimalistic” designs are not truly minimalistic because they are larger, and use more expensive building materials and finishes.

330 North Wabash in Chicago, a minimalist building by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

There are observers who describe the emergence of minimalism as a response to the brashness and chaos of urban life. In Japan, for example, minimalist architecture began to gain traction in the 1980s when its cities experienced rapid expansion and booming population. The design was considered an antidote to the “overpowering presence of traffic, advertising, jumbled building scales, and imposing roadways.” The chaotic environment was not only driven by urbanization, industrialization, and technology but also the Japanese experience of constantly having to demolish structures on account of the destruction wrought by World War II and the earthquakes, including the calamities it entails such as fire. The minimalist design philosophy did not arrive in Japan by way of another country as it was already part of the Japanese culture rooted on the Zen philosophy. There are those who specifically attribute the design movement to Japan’s spirituality and view of nature.

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886–1969) adopted the motto “Less is more” to describe his aesthetic. His tactic was one of arranging the necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity—he enlisted every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes; for example, designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom. Designer Buckminster Fuller (1895–1983) adopted the engineer’s goal of “Doing more with less”, but his concerns were oriented toward technology and engineering rather than aesthetics.

 

 
 

 

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